Occlusioal anatomy of deciduous molars

PICTURE DECIDUOUS MOLARS OCCLUSAL

Figure  A, Maxillary first molar. MBC, Mesiobuccal cusp; MTF, mesial triangular fossa; MP, mesial pit; CP, central pit; MLC, mesiolingual cusp; DLC, distolingual cusp; DTF, distal triangular fossa; DDG, distal developmental groove; BDG, buccal developmental groove; DBC, distobuccal cusp; CDG, central developmental groove. B, Maxillary second molar. BDG, Buccal developmental groove; MBC, mesiobuccal cusp; CDG, central developmental groove; MLC, mesiolingual cusp; FC, fifth cusp; LDG, lingual developmental groove; DLC, distolingual cusp; DDG, distal developmental groove; OR, oblique ridge; DBC, distobuccal cusp; CP, central pit. C, Mandibular first molar. CDG, Central developmental groove; DBC, distobuccal cusp; BDG, buccal developmental groove; CP, central pit; DLC, distolingual cusp; LDC, lingual developmental groove; MLC, mesiolingual cusp; MP, mesial pit; MBC, mesiobuccal cusp. D, Mandibular second molar. DBC, Distobuccal cusp; CP, central pit; DC, distal cusp; DBDG, distobuccal developmental groove; DP, distal pit; CDG, central developmental groove; DLC, distolingual cusp; LDG, lingual developmental groove; MLC, mesiolingual cusp; MP, mesial pit; MBDG, mesiobuccal developmental groove; MBC, mesiobuccal cusp.

Sometimes the primary maxillary first molar has a well-defined triangular ridge connecting the mesiolingual cusp with the distobuccal cusp. When well developed, it is called the oblique ridge. In some of these teeth, the ridge is indefinite, and the central developmental groove extends from the mesial pit to the distal developmental groove. This disto-occlusal groove is always seen and may or may not extend through to the lingual surface, outlining a distolingual cusp. The distal marginal ridge is thin and poorly developed in comparison with the mesial marginal ridge.

Summary of the occlusal aspect of the maxillary first primary molar

The form of the maxillary first primary molar varies from that of any tooth in the permanent dentition. Although no premolars are in the primary set, in some respects the crown of this primary molar resembles a permanent maxillary premolar. Nevertheless, the divisions of the occlusal surface and the root form with its efficient anchorage make it a molar, both in type and function. Figure 3-25 presents all the aspects of the primary maxillary first molars.

Source: http://what-when-how.com/dental-anatomy-physiology-and-occlusion/the-primary-deciduous-teeth-dental-anatomy-physiology-and-occlusion-part-4/